Why do you train? 

I know that wanting to physically look better and or feel better motivates most of us.  Let’s be honest, we all have some level of vanity attached to the drive that gets us through the WOD each day. Underlying any of our motivating factors is the emotional reason why we stay on track and why we fall off track.

 Identifying yours is a key to staying on track or getting back on the ball.  Maybe the stress relief of aggressive training is what helps you.  Releasing stress through training is as beneficial physically as it is emotionally.

“Me time” as some call it - your hour at the gym, when there is nothing else on your mind other than the task at hand.  This can be very cathartic.  Holding a barbell over your head or pulling your entire bodyweight over a pull-up bar doesn’t leave much room for distraction or noise.  Clearing your mind for that hour can do so much and really free you.

Personally, I find that challenging myself physically in the wods also builds the mental strength to push through when the wod is most difficult.  That translates into other areas of my life, helping me to push through other situations that, in the past, may have gotten the better of me.  To me, it is just as important to build emotional and mental strength, as it is to build the physical.

Emotions are at the core of every decision we make. For my friends that have dropped the ball on their training over the summer; I know that you want to feel better, look better, perform better and have more energy.  But why is it so hard to get back in the routine? This is because the body and mind will always take the path of least resistance.  “Sure, I’d absolutely love to eat super clean all the time,” you may say.  But it just so happens that the convenience of fast food and not taking time to meal prep is an easier choice.  For most, it is unconscious.

I urge you all to slow your pace and try to catch yourself often throughout your day.  Take the time to ask,
“Why am I doing this or that?” Ask “why am I feeling this way?” Ask yourself, “If I make choice a or choice b how will either affect me.”  “Will it make me better and help me or will it hurt and or stifle my growth?” 

So often, we are moving so fast that we don’t take the time to ask ourselves these questions.  I challenge you to try a few days of mindfulness.  Slow yourself down a bit and be present in each decision - ponder the pros and cons of each.  Be more aware. Having a heightened awareness and being a bit more present in my life has helped to motivate me to get things done and also to stay consistent in the things that make me feel good; working out, meditating and eating clean.  This mindful approach helps me to see the benefits of the choices I make. 

 

Over all, motivation comes from progress and progress comes from consistent actions.  Consistent action comes from positive habits, and that my friends, comes from the decisions we make. It’s all in our choices!  I hope you decide to choose the path that is best for you - one that is full of positive habits, dedication, and mindfulness!

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